CT April 2011

Chalk Talk 4/18/2011

  • timing for leeward mark traps
    • enter the two boatlength circle on starboard (do not round the mark!). the other team will try to round the mark, and when they’re close enough, sheet in and make the other person gybe off.
    • don’t set up too early, else you will drift down into a bad position. this depends on the wind speed, so you need to judge it. if it’s heavy, slow down way ahead of the mark, if it’s light, you have more leeway. just make sure you’re in the two boatlength circle before the other person
  • starting (team racing)
    • tailing
      • goal is to push the other person beyond the layline of the pin. if you’re the one being tailed, try to make the other person get an overlap on you, then head them up. if you’re being tailed on starboard, the farther you go toward the pin, the worse off you are.
      • also use the boat to your advantage. if you’re being tailed off to the pin side, use the boat as a pick, then tack back around toward starboard. this way you’ll be heading back toward the right side of the course.
      • if you are tailing someone, make sure to mirror them as much as possible. match speed, and your crew should be doing the exact same thing as the other crew, while your skipper should be doing the exact same thing as the other skipper.
      • if tailing on port, you may end up doing circles. this usually doesn’t happen in team racing, but you need to be careful.
  • protests
    • if you get into a protest situation, hail the other boat and identify them. must get an acknowledgement. watch to make sure they do their circles. (also look for other boats nearby that could act as witnesses). notify the race committee after the race is over.
    • three minute justice.
      • each team gets one minute to state their case. be concise and don’t make up any facts. if you have a rulebook, find the rule and cite it. be very sure of your facts.
 

Chalk Talk 4/11/2011

  • team racing
    • crew needs to be much more watchful during team racing. know the combination of your team at all times, and also know which combination you’re likely to get into. know what teammates behind you are doing, and what the other team is doing in front of you.
    • combinations
      • winning, “stable” combinations
        • 1, 2, anything. two boats together, so the other team can’t really do anything.
        • 2, 3, 4. all boats are together. keep 5 and 6 on other team in 5 and 6.
        • 1, 4, 5. least stable. the two boats in front of 4 and 5 have control over them, so be careful, and keep 6 where he is.
          • if the other team has the 1, 4, 5, you should try to convert yourselves into a 2, 3, 5 (winning), then a 2, 3, 4.
      • winning, “unstable” combinations
        • 1, 3, anything. convert to a 1, 2, anything.
        • 2, 3, 5. convert to a 2, 3, 4.
    • downwind rights
      • two ways to establish overlap.
        • established from the side. (gybe in)
          • not restricted. able to head the other boat up as far as you want.
        • established from behind.
          • restricted to sail below proper course. (course you would sail in absence of other boats. fastest way to the mark) upwind this is relatively set, but downwind is more fluid.
          • windward boat must keep clear, but leeward boat cannot head you up any farther than their proper course.
 

Chalk Talk 4/4/2011

 

  • team racing
    • upwind
      • pass-back
        • convert 1-3 to 1-2. windward boat comes down (stay clear, though!) and luffs jib, leeward boat comes up and pinches other boat off.
      • hold other boat out to slow the race down. make sure he can’t tack back by slowing down or heading you up
      • mark trap
        • sit just above the layline on starboard. guard the mark, so to speak. if you are coming up on somebody trying to mark trap you, sit behind them (but slightly windward) and make them round the mark first.
    • downwind
      • high-low
        • first person who rounds the mark goes high, second goes low (straight for the mark). you can do pass-backs this way by pinching out boats between the two of you.
      • overlap
        • you can head boats up to slow them down. if you establish overlap from behind, you have to gybe twice or else sail proper course down to the mark.
      • crews
        • when holding the jib out on a reach, always wing it using the lazy sheet, i.e. the one you wouldn’t pull for quickly going upwind. this allows you to have a great deal more maneuverability .
      • mark-trap
        • wait above the mark on starboard. make sure you don’t hit the mark.